Iowa Juvenile Home and Girls State Training School

Iowa Juvenile Home Protection Task Force:

Governor Branstad created the Iowa Juvenile Home Protection Task Force with Executive Order Number 82. The Task Force is comprised of five members appointed by the Governor which includes the Iowa Department of Human Services Director and four individuals with expertise in child advocacy, special education, behavioral issues and other relevant experience. The Task Force held four public meetings in order to reach goals and objectives as identified in Executive Order 82.

September 18, 2013 Meeting

Meeting Agenda

Introduction Letter from Jerry Foxhoven, Task Force Chair

Presentations from Mark Day, Interim Superintendent

Meeting Minutes

September 24, 2013 Meeting

Meeting Agenda

Meeting Minutes

Options - Iowa Juvenile Home/Girls State Training School

Criteria for Placement - Iowa Juvenile Home/Girls State Training School

Seclusion and Placement Data - Iowa Juvenile Home/Girls State Training School

Prior Placement Summary - Iowa Juvenile Home/Girls State Training School

Disability Rights Iowa Presentation

September 30, 2013 Meeting

Meeting Agenda

Meeting Minutes

Resident Survey - Iowa Juvenile Home/Girls State Training School

Seclusion and Restraint Trend Data - Iowa Juvenile Home/Girls State Training School

Out-of-State Placement Data

Department of Education Recommendation

Analysis of Funding Sources

Iowa Task Force for Young Women Presentation

October 7, 2013 Meeting

Meeting Agenda

Meeting Minutes

Final Report

Placement of Youth

On December 9, 2013, the Iowa Department of Human Services announced that 21 youth at the Iowa Juvenile Home would be moved to court-approved placements in licensed and/or accredited settings as recommended by the governor's task force.

Why were youth moved?

The Iowa Juvenile Home Protection Task Force said it would serve the best interest of the youth by providing treatment in licensed and/or accredited settings. That could not easily be done with the mixed population of youth at the Iowa Juvenile Home, which did not have regular, formal licensing inspections or accreditation.

Where were the 21 youth placed?

  • All of the youth have found placements in Iowa
  • All of the types of placements are routinely approved by the courts and are based on the individual child's needs
  • 6 have been able to return home
  • 15 have found placements in licensed and/or accredited settings
  • Of the 15, the court approved 1 shelter placement and 2 detention placements. Shelter is a temporary placement and services are available. Detention, also temporary, can only be used if a youth is adjudicated delinquent or is facing delinquency charges

Who decides placement?

The courts make the final placement decision. They take into consideration information from various sources which can include DHS, county attorney, guardian ad litem, providers, law enforcement, court-appointed advocates, etc. Joint treatment planning teams made recommendations for CINA (Children In Need of Assistance) youth, and the same resources were available to juvenile court services for placement of delinquent youth.

Who did the Iowa Juvenile Home serve?

  • The typical length of stay at the Iowa Juvenile Home was less than 5 months for juveniles and 9 months for CINA.
  • At IJH, the typical delinquent girl had over six prior placements, was 16 years-old, had special education needs, and a mental health diagnosis. The average CINA girl and boy had over nine prior placements, was 15.3 years-old, had special education needs, and had a mental health diagnosis.

Where will CINA and delinquent youth be served?

  • The majority of Iowa's delinquent and CINA youth are already served through private providers who can offer a wider array of services in less restrictive settings, based on the individual needs of each youth.
  • Many youth will be able to find appropriate, quality care through these community-based providers. Others may need a higher level of care at PMICs.
  • Since July 1, 2013, 50 youth who exited the Iowa Juvenile Home found court-approved placements in Iowa, based on their individual needs. Out-of-state placements may be appropriate in a small number of cases.

What is the overall goal?

Permanency is the goal of the child welfare system, and the department's priority is to maintain, or reunite, children with their families as long as that can be done safely. When that's not possible, we work to find safe, stable placements in the least restrictive setting possible which fit each child's individual needs. Some youth need different levels of care at different points of time.

DHS is committed to serving the type of youth historically served by the Iowa Juvenile Home, and the department will continue to closely examine placement needs of CINA and delinquent youth.

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